Son Of Batman Review

There’s an extension to the bat family in this animated movie as Bruce Wayne meets his secret son. Damian has already lucked out in the gene pool and he follows quite the legacy. With Batman as his biological father, and Talia al Ghul his Mim and in turn, R’as al Ghul being his grandfather you’d be forgiven for assuming his life would go down a certain route.

Of all the DC animated movies I’ve watched this would probably rank as last place on my list. That doesn’t mean it’s terrible but I felt like it just didn’t reach its full potential. I enjoy The League of Assassins but they didn’t come across as the huge threat they pose to be. Talia was highly sexualised and while of course its completely plausible there’s more sides to her character than just being kick ass, seeing her go all Jessica Rabbit kind of took away from her character. I felt like there were issues with the dialogue which at times made the movie seem unpolished. Lastly, Damian just comes across as hugely unlikeable. A pompous brat in fact. We often like characters who are villainous and do bad things but with Damian there just didn’t seem to be any redeeming qualities. I couldn’t help but just feel annoyed every time he was on screen.

Having said all that there were also many good things about this. The bat suit and batmobile had a real classic look which drew me back to my childhood and a Batman I’m very familiar with. I think Jason O’Mara does an ace job in bringing Batman to life once again. Alfred was pure joy and delivered many one liners which were pretty funny. I’d have to actually say this would be one of my favourite appearances from Alfred. Nightwing featured in the movie and who doesn’t love seeing Dick Grayson!! I also really enjoyed Deathstroke and his part kind of served as an introduction to him without giving us a huge backstory.

While Son of Batman isn’t the strongest DC movie out there it’s still worth a watch and hopefully serves as a set up for greater stories to come.

This Week in DCTV – 29/1/21

We’re back with just Batwoman again, lets see what the guys thought!!

Jim – Ok so after last weeks triumphant return of Batwoman I was quite excited for this episode…..unfortunately episode 2 didn’t quite live up to the level of the premiere, it was still a good episode, Ryan’s character development continues well and I do really like her but the rest of the ep felt like a little bit like filler, there are a lot of side stories going on so i just feel like they need to tighten it up going forward, but I’m looking forward to where it goes!

Rob – I still love everything about Ryan and it’s fun watching her find her footing as the new Batwoman. Although I enjoyed the interactions between Ryan and Alice very much and the poison bats were fun, this kind of felt like a filler episode to me and for episode two that’s not the best. Ryan discovering Kate’s diary and beginning to write to Kate as she did to Bruce, was a nice touch.

It might be a little crazy because of the general tone of the show but I want to see something a bit more lighthearted from it, more so to have other layers to Ryan so she doesn’t just become the typical, brooding vigilante stereotype.

Alan – Week two, and I came to Batwoman for episode 2, and so far so good. Again I enjoyed this. I though Javicia Leslie was good again as Ryan, but I think Alice steals the show (I thought she did in what I saw of season 1 too). OI thought episode felt very much something that fits well in the “Batman Universe”.

There were a few things that I particularly enjoyed, I chuckled at the cop trying to shoot bats with a shotgun, and I enjoyed the view through the cowl when Ryan was looking for the device bringing in the bats. It felt very much like detective vision from the Arkham game series. I did feel like the bats were gotten rid of a little too easily. I’m not sure that an explosive device that small thrown on the road under a bus would make it explode the way it did and kill all those bats. Then I thought, hey, it’s TV show based on a comic book so we don’t need (and probably don’t want) that to be super realistic.

Overall, once again, I enjoyed this, and look forward to seeing where it goes now that Ryan has now been accepted to become Batwoman officially to give Gotham the hope it needs (until Kate returns)

Batman: Court Of Owls Review

Looking back a decade on, it is quite clear that DC intended to take some creative risks when launching the New 52. The comic book industry has gone through universal reboots, but there was a sense that this time it was in fact, different. Suddenly Grant Morrison was headlining Action Comics, Justice League was given a big blockbuster start, and over in the Batman corner of the DC Universe, the reins were handed over to Scott Snyder and Tony S. Daniel. A bold move, considering Snyder had only done one other Batman story at this point (with Dick Grayson in the cowl, not Bruce), and Tony S. Daniel when not collaborating with another writer, has decidedly mixed results. Still, the fanbase was primed for the creative teams on most of the books, especially once it was announced that Greg Capullo would be joining Scott Snyder on Batman.

Batman: The Court of Owls was the first arc of the second volume of the Batman. Snyder and Capullo set out to tell a dark, mysterious and treacherous story of intrigue that would have the Dark Knight Detective questioning not only the motives of his new foe(s), but also just how much he thinks he knows Gotham City’s history… which of course also describes eighty percent or more of Batman stories published in the past eighty years. A digression…

That is not to say this is a terrible storyline. It does have its moments, and it is certainly served well by Greg Capullo’s more than capable hand in the art department, but the story ultimate buckles under its own weight. Eleven issues if you read just the main story, considerably more if you get bogged down by the sub-story “Night of the Owls” partway through this epic. While for the most part paced well within individual issues, this entire “epic” could have easily been told with fewer issues; half as few, if you include the ancillary titles. The reveal at the end of the story comes across as cliched, and a plot point if memory serves, is never even really explored again, by his creator, or any others. And considering the character the cliched plot point refers to is now dead, it may never get addressed again.

If the reader takes it as a separate parts of a whole, the storyline did give us a new foe in both the Court of Owls itself as well as their Talon foot soldiers. Those concepts have considerable legs, having been used in both animated media, and allegedly for the upcoming Gotham Knights game. Even if Scott Snyder’s story telling suffers, his concepts and ideas do not. During the most ridiculous moments, Batman still seems badass or incredibly cool, but reading it a second time years on, you begin to realize you fell for the hype a bit…

Unfortunately, Snyder still suffers under his own success and hubris with subsequent stories. If you wish to read him at his best, you should pick up a copy of Batman: Black Mirror. That is not to suggest this is a terrible storyline; there are worse, and at least one better.

Collects: Batman: (Vol. 2) 1-11

Justice League: War Review

Based on the Justice League Origin comic, this film introduces us to The Justice League in quite a spectacular way. This is 79 mins of non stop action as we see some of our favourite DC heroes meet each other for the very first time, take on a huge villain and eventually come together as a team.

As the film starts we discover that this is set in a period of time where heroes are just surfacing and the general public are not keen on them at all. After a few sightings in public they think Batman is an evil vampire and as Wonder Woman takes a more public stance, she’s labelled a whore and bimbo. What I enjoyed most about this was the interactions between all of these great characters. Most of them do not like each other to start with and they don’t realise that they shouldn’t be fighting each other as they actually have a common goal. Each character’s skill set is really shown off which serves as a great introduction to viewers who aren’t so familiar with them.

I really felt like I was watching a comic brought to life as the animation style is visually pleasing. Add this to some really great talent from actors like Sean Astin, Jason O’Mara, Michelle Monoghan and Shemar Moore, it s a winning combination. Shemar does a great job in portraying Cyborg’s origin story and the complexity of Victor’s relationship with his Dad gives the film some heart. Darkseid acts as the big bad in this and whilst he looks completely grimacing and indestructible, Steve Blum’s vocals make him appear even more threatening.

You instantly feel the connection between Superman and Batman and tracks are laid for a more interesting relationship between Superman and Wonder Woman (much to the upset of Steve Trevor). Whilst Cyborg is quite intense, The Flash, Shazam and Green Lantern provide some humour and light relief. Justin Kirk gives us a Green Lantern comparable with what we saw from Ryan Reynolds. It was also interesting to have some pop culture thrown in for laughs with references to things like True Blood and World of Warcraft.

Overall, Justice League: War is a really enjoyable animated movie which made me want to watch the next one straight away. It uses a fantastic villain to bring together a group of superheroes who figure out a way to use their awesome powers together and save the world. I loved it.

Earth-9 Podcast – Ep32 – Wonder Woman ’84 *SPOILERS*

Welcome to our first podcast of the new year! And the biggest thing in the DC Universe right now has to be Wonder Woman ’84 so join us as we discuss everything and we mean everything (spoilers) about the movie, then we talk about what DC stuff we’re looking forward to this year! (some slight audio issues with this one, Jim’s audio was taken from his webcam not microphone because sometimes computers go crazy!!)